Exhibitions

Digital Window Gallery: Tabitha Jussa

17 September - 6 November 2021

Main Exhibition

Collective Matters

1 October - 12 December 2021

Exhibitions

Polly Braden: Holding The Baby

30 September - 31 October 2021

Events

Open Rooms #16: Agency of Women

23 September 2021

Projects

PLATFORM ISSUE 04: CROSSROADS

10 September 2021

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

Digital Window Gallery: Our Lands

23 August - 19 September 2021

Exhibitions

Imagining Disaster: Essay Series

30 August 2021

Exhibitions

Rivers of the World

6 September 2021

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

Instagram Residency: Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley

30 August - 5 September 2021

Past Events

PLATFORM: Issue 4 Launch Party

10 September 2021

Past Events

Imagining Disaster: Contemporary Art X Science Fiction

2 September 2021

Past Events LOOK Events

Open Rooms #15: Common Ground

8 September 2021

Past Events

Launch Party: One Day At A Time

19 August 2021

Past Events

Open Eye Gallery book club presents: Bila Yarrudhanggalangdhuray

9 September 2021

Exhibitions

Sam Batley: ONE DAY AT A TIME

18 August - 19 September 2021

Exhibitions

VR: Wirral Hospitals’ School and MaxLiteracy Award

10 June - 3 September 2021

Past Exhibitions

Return To Nature

30 July 2021

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

VR: First Light New Northern Graduates Exhibition

22 May - 4 July 2021

Past Exhibitions

We Are Nature

30 July - 14 August 2021

Exhibitions

Liverpool Arab Arts Festival — Jessica El Mal: Grounds For Concern

16 July - 15 August 2021

Exhibitions

Digital Window Gallery: Who We Are

8 July - 31 July 2021

Past Exhibitions

Whose Land Is It?

8 July - 19 September 2021

Exhibitions

VR Student Exhibitions: UCEN

9 June - 13 June 2021

Exhibitions

VR Student Exhibitions: Youth Culture by Whitby High School

23 June - 27 June 2021

Exhibitions

VR Student Exhibitions: Arc with Hugh Baird

16 June - 20 June 2021

Past Events

First Light: Photography Writing Now – Tilt Launch Party

9 July 2021

Past Events

OPEN ROOMS #14: Separated Together

24 June 2021

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

Student Exhibitions: Whitby High School

23 June - 27 June 2021

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

Student Exhibitions: UCEN

9 June - 13 June 2021

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

Student Exhibitions: Arc

16 June - 20 June 2021

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

Digital Window Gallery: HOMETOWNS

10 June 2021

Exhibitions Main Exhibition

Digital Window Gallery: Postcards from us x

10 June - 20 June 2021

LightNight 2021: Play

21 May 2021

Heavy Gardening Art Trail Photowalk

21 May 2021

OPEN ROOMS #13: A BALKAN JOURNEY WITH CHRIS LESLIE

17 June 2021

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

First Light New Northern Graduates Exhibition

22 May 2021

Past Events

Open Eye Gallery book club presents: Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi

3 June 2021

Past Events

First Light Spotlight: Interior Tension

22 June 2021

Past Events

First Light Spotlight: Networked Beings

8 June 2021

Past Events

First Light Spotlight: Things Are Strange

25 May 2021

Past Events

OPEN ROOMS #12: INDEPENDENTS BIENNIAL

6 May 2021

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

Liverpool Biennial 2021: The Stomach and the Port

19 May - 6 June 2021

Picturing England’s High Streets: Prescot

7 April 2021

Picturing England’s High Street: Chester

7 April 2021

Exhibitions

Reclaim The City: Suzanne St Clare

8 April 2021

Past Events

First Light Spotlight: Parallel Histories

11 May 2021

Past Events

First Light Spotlight: After Nature

27 April 2021

Past Events

First Light Spotlight: Unearthly Matter

13 April 2021

Exhibitions

Hanging out: Interviews

23 March - 5 April 2021

Exhibitions

Digital Window Gallery: Independents Biennial

18 March - 6 June 2021

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Whose Land Is It?

8 July - 19 September 2021

The gallery is operating with distancing measures in place; please follow guidelines to help us keep you and all other users of the gallery space safe.

OPEN WEDNESDAY – SUNDAY 11-4. SEE DISTANCING GUIDELINES HERE

Whose Land Is It? brings together three Australian artists approaching the idea of the landscape and the elements of it which may have previously escaped our attention. The drying riverbeds directly linked to climate change and land misuse and mismanagement by James Tylor, the materials and tokens gathered during Atong Atem’s walks through her local area and the feminist reading of the landscape as interpreted by Amanda Williams all help in establishing more engaged ways of reading the land, and understanding the impact the landscape has on us. It is through these images that a sense of ownership or belonging can begin to form. Whose land is being photographed, how can we picture ourselves there, and who is the landscape for?


James Tylor’s Economics of Water in Gallery 1 presents photographs of the Murray-Darling basin in southeastern Australia, where resources and potential have disappeared through water mismanagement, industrialisation, and short-sighted decisions. Each photograph is overlaid with gold geometric shapes symbolising the former wealth of the land, its forgotten uses, and the dislocated relationship between humanity and knowledge of the water.

In Gallery 2, Atong Atem takes us on a journey through lockdown with Monstera Obliqua 2021 & Photo Weavings 2021. The layers found within and on the surface of the photographs are the traces of natural materials collected during these walks, acting as a map of the walk as they catalogue and present the topography and content of the local landscape. The woven nature of the work presents a tactile, physical way of connecting with the outside world.

In Gallery 3, Nichols Gorge Walk, Kosciuszko National Park, 2021 by Amanda Williams introduces a feminist reading to the landscape and cave structures seen in this series. Working with fogged paper and repeated prints, the images The images encourage a focus that is based less on conquering and overcoming the land, and is instead more reflective, collaborative and in synchrony with the natural elements, applying a feminist approach to landscape photography.

This exhibition invites our visitors to think about the role of visual culture and photography in helping us to question the images we hold and refer to when we think of the landscape, and what action can be taken to preserve and protect the land.

Open Eye Gallery acknowledges Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the Traditional Owners of lands and waters across Australia and recognises that Indigenous sovereignty has never been ceded.

Image: Economics of water #10 (Canal), 2018, James Tylor

The gallery is operating with distancing measures in place; please follow guidelines to help us keep you and all other users of the gallery space safe.

OPEN WEDNESDAY – SUNDAY 11-4. SEE DISTANCING GUIDELINES HERE

Whose Land Is It? brings together three Australian artists approaching the idea of the landscape and the elements of it which may have previously escaped our attention. The drying riverbeds directly linked to climate change and land misuse and mismanagement by James Tylor, the materials and tokens gathered during Atong Atem’s walks through her local area and the feminist reading of the landscape as interpreted by Amanda Williams all help in establishing more engaged ways of reading the land, and understanding the impact the landscape has on us. It is through these images that a sense of ownership or belonging can begin to form. Whose land is being photographed, how can we picture ourselves there, and who is the landscape for?


James Tylor’s Economics of Water in Gallery 1 presents photographs of the Murray-Darling basin in southeastern Australia, where resources and potential have disappeared through water mismanagement, industrialisation, and short-sighted decisions. Each photograph is overlaid with gold geometric shapes symbolising the former wealth of the land, its forgotten uses, and the dislocated relationship between humanity and knowledge of the water.

In Gallery 2, Atong Atem takes us on a journey through lockdown with Monstera Obliqua 2021 & Photo Weavings 2021. The layers found within and on the surface of the photographs are the traces of natural materials collected during these walks, acting as a map of the walk as they catalogue and present the topography and content of the local landscape. The woven nature of the work presents a tactile, physical way of connecting with the outside world.

In Gallery 3, Nichols Gorge Walk, Kosciuszko National Park, 2021 by Amanda Williams introduces a feminist reading to the landscape and cave structures seen in this series. Working with fogged paper and repeated prints, the images The images encourage a focus that is based less on conquering and overcoming the land, and is instead more reflective, collaborative and in synchrony with the natural elements, applying a feminist approach to landscape photography.

This exhibition invites our visitors to think about the role of visual culture and photography in helping us to question the images we hold and refer to when we think of the landscape, and what action can be taken to preserve and protect the land.

Open Eye Gallery acknowledges Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the Traditional Owners of lands and waters across Australia and recognises that Indigenous sovereignty has never been ceded.

Image: Economics of water #10 (Canal), 2018, James Tylor

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