Events

Poscards from us x: Online Art Workshops

29 January - 12 February 2021

Events

WHAT WE DO IN LOCKDOWN

5 January 2021

HYPERTEXT: Books Beyond Bars – Felix McNulty in conversation with Sarah Jane Baker

28 November 2020

HYPERTEXT: Ruth White – The Role of the Photobook in Representing the British Working Classes

28 November 2020

HYPERTEXT: Yasmine Akim ‘Decolonise art schools & showcase the agency of marginalised people’

28 November 2020

HYPERTEXT: Jason Evans – Sound & Vision

28 November 2020

HYPERTEXT: ROOT-ed Zine – Our Experience of Navigating through Arts and Media as People of Colour

28 November 2020

HYPERTEXT: Present and Continuous Q&A with Liz Wewiora and the Many Hands Craft Collective

28 November 2020

HYPERTEXT: Rose Nordin of OOMK in conversation with Kerol Izwan of Musotrees

28 November 2020

HYPERTEXT: Jade Montserrat in conversation with Nikita Gill

28 November 2020

HYPERTEXT: Sam Hutchinson in conversation with Aram Sabbah of Skatepal

28 November 2020

Get Involved: The Story of Liverpool Through Its Trees

24 November 2020

Past Events

Home Turf: Fans, Foodbanks and Photography

17 December 2020

Past Events

Scottie Press: Digital Residency

7 December - 11 December 2020

Past Events

Tell It Like It Is: Ian Clegg and Laura Robertson in Conversation

20 November 2020

Exhibitions

VR: L— A City Through Its People

5 November - 7 March 2020

Exhibitions

Peer to Peer HK/UK — Lee Wing Ki: Night Walk (an excerpt)

16 November - 30 November 2020

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

Peer to Peer: UK / HK

11 November 2020

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

Watch: Liverpool Slavery Virtual Tour

27 October 2020

A Message From Open Eye Gallery: Covid-19 Update

2 November 2020

Exhibitions

VR — The New West

30 October 2020

Past Exhibitions

TO BE FRANK

30 October - 15 November 2020

Past Exhibitions

THE LIVES WE LEAD

28 October - 11 November 2020

Past Events Past Exhibitions

Love Is An Action: Black History Panel

29 October 2020

Projects

VR — The Time We Call Our Own

3 September 2020

Exhibitions Main Exhibition

Exhibition: L— A City Through Its People

5 November - 7 March 2021

Projects

Harold Offeh — When Was The Time I Could Call My Own?

15 October 2020

Projects

Mirjam Wirz — Sonidero City

8 October 2020

Projects

Open Rooms #9 Access to Art: Who is art for? (w/ Mike Pinnington and Larry Achiampong)

13 October 2020

Projects

PLATFORM ISSUE 2: THE NEW NORMAL

7 October 2020

Past Events

Atrium Exhibition: Illustrating Anthropology

12 November - 30 November 2020

Past Events

Laurence Westgaph: Liverpool Slavery Virtual Tour

27 October 2020

Exhibitions Open Source Exhibitions

DIGITAL WINDOW GALLERY: OPEN SOURCE #18 – KELEENNA ONYEAKA

1 October - 31 October 2020

Projects

Tobias Zielony — Maskirovka

27 August 2020

Projects

Save Some Space (The Time We Call Our Own Online #4)

20 August 2020

Projects

Andrew Miksys — Disko (The Time We Call Our Own: Online #3)

6 August 2020

Projects

Oliver Sieber: Imaginary Club (The Time We Call Our Own: Online #2)

30 July 2020

Projects

Getting Ready: Amelia Lonsdale and Her Mum (#1)

23 July 2020

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions Open Source Exhibitions

DIGITAL WINDOW GALLERY: OPEN SOURCE #17 – SAMANTHA JAGGER

3 September - 30 September 2020

Past Exhibitions

you out tonight?

10 August 2020

Projects

folio20: Hugh Baird University Centre

10 August 2020

Projects

Sarah Eyre (Untitled)

10 August 2020

Projects

Activity Packs for Older People

20 July 2020

Projects

Young People + Family Activity Packs

20 July 2020

Projects

Open Rooms #3: Photographing the Internet (w/ Mishka Henner)

7 May 2020

Projects

Open Rooms #2: Separated Together

30 April 2020

Projects

Open Rooms #7: Photography Does Not Love You (Katrina Sluis w/ Jacob Bolton)

2 July 2020

Projects

Open Rooms #8: Photography and Racialisation

9 July 2020

Projects

Open Rooms #5: Class of 2020 — Seba Kurtis in conversation with Mariama Attah

18 June 2020

Projects

Love is an Action

11 June 2020

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Sarah Eyre (Untitled)

Open Eye Gallery How Will We Remember Covid-19 Art Commission

Gif 5205 Version 1, Sarah Eyre, 2020. (Please note: the above image is an animated gif, it may take some time to load on some internet connections!)

Twitch, shift, jerk, slip, repeat. These are words that describe this series of GIFs made in response to the How Will We Remember? commission. They are also words that might summon up the now familiar feelings of dealing with life during a global pandemic. 

The starting point for these digital works was the impact of Covid-19 on women. Research has shown that statistically women are more likely to suffer economically and many women have effectively been ‘re-traditionalised’ – confined to the domestic space of the home. But, we are all navigating unfamiliar terrains, constantly re-drawing our boundaries as our physical presence and visibility in the world continually slips and changes. Many of us find ourselves existing in an in-between place, somewhere between virtual and physical worlds, communicating through barriers, windows and screens and having to negotiate the unexpected materialities of this new space including the disruptive buffering, freezing and glitching of our virtual lives.     

There is a feeling of being on the cusp; of being suspended between different spaces and states, and the feeling of fragmentation as we sit at home looking out of the window whilst our digital doppelgängers play in virtual space has informed my choice of using GIFs as the output for this commission. There is a feeling when you view the GIFs that their surfaces could slip at any moment. GIFs can make us loose the awareness of our own edges as we get sucked in to their never ending loop. The repetition, at first comforting, can quickly become uncomfortable. The analogies with our current situation don’t end there – GIFs are open, endlessly adaptable – and of course, they can go viral. 

My use of paper and digital collage – an artistic method already associated with disorientation –  when merged with the jerky animation caused by the GIF process, makes the original source photographs unfamiliar. Combining different digital and analogue textures and effects suggests uncontrolled slippages and uncanny movements. The five GIFs are all different yet similar motifs, colours and textures repeat and dissolve across all of them – a subtle acknowledgement of the repetition of daily life under lockdown and partial lockdown. The colour palette is subdued, monochrome at times, however the colour blue features most frequently as blue is the colour most associated with liminal states – it is the colour of twilight and also the colour associated with cleanliness and protection – disinfectant bottles, PPE gloves and masks. The recurring silhouette motif alludes to the continual multiplication and dematerialisation of our bodies, as we flit between different physical and virtual spaces and states and protect ourselves behind layers of surfaces and screens.  

This commission is part of How Will We Remember?, a programme of commissions from Open Eye Gallery and University of Salford Art Collection that seeks to identify gaps in the public consciousness around who is affected by the global health crisis, and create opportunities to document the lived experience of those who have found themselves especially vulnerable. 

Open Eye Gallery How Will We Remember Covid-19 Art Commission

Gif 5205 Version 1, Sarah Eyre, 2020. (Please note: the above image is an animated gif, it may take some time to load on some internet connections!)

Twitch, shift, jerk, slip, repeat. These are words that describe this series of GIFs made in response to the How Will We Remember? commission. They are also words that might summon up the now familiar feelings of dealing with life during a global pandemic. 

The starting point for these digital works was the impact of Covid-19 on women. Research has shown that statistically women are more likely to suffer economically and many women have effectively been ‘re-traditionalised’ – confined to the domestic space of the home. But, we are all navigating unfamiliar terrains, constantly re-drawing our boundaries as our physical presence and visibility in the world continually slips and changes. Many of us find ourselves existing in an in-between place, somewhere between virtual and physical worlds, communicating through barriers, windows and screens and having to negotiate the unexpected materialities of this new space including the disruptive buffering, freezing and glitching of our virtual lives.     

There is a feeling of being on the cusp; of being suspended between different spaces and states, and the feeling of fragmentation as we sit at home looking out of the window whilst our digital doppelgängers play in virtual space has informed my choice of using GIFs as the output for this commission. There is a feeling when you view the GIFs that their surfaces could slip at any moment. GIFs can make us loose the awareness of our own edges as we get sucked in to their never ending loop. The repetition, at first comforting, can quickly become uncomfortable. The analogies with our current situation don’t end there – GIFs are open, endlessly adaptable – and of course, they can go viral. 

My use of paper and digital collage – an artistic method already associated with disorientation –  when merged with the jerky animation caused by the GIF process, makes the original source photographs unfamiliar. Combining different digital and analogue textures and effects suggests uncontrolled slippages and uncanny movements. The five GIFs are all different yet similar motifs, colours and textures repeat and dissolve across all of them – a subtle acknowledgement of the repetition of daily life under lockdown and partial lockdown. The colour palette is subdued, monochrome at times, however the colour blue features most frequently as blue is the colour most associated with liminal states – it is the colour of twilight and also the colour associated with cleanliness and protection – disinfectant bottles, PPE gloves and masks. The recurring silhouette motif alludes to the continual multiplication and dematerialisation of our bodies, as we flit between different physical and virtual spaces and states and protect ourselves behind layers of surfaces and screens.  

This commission is part of How Will We Remember?, a programme of commissions from Open Eye Gallery and University of Salford Art Collection that seeks to identify gaps in the public consciousness around who is affected by the global health crisis, and create opportunities to document the lived experience of those who have found themselves especially vulnerable. 

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