Events

The Time We Call Our Own: Oliver Sieber: Imaginary Club (Watch Party)

30 July 2020

Events

The Time We Call Our Own: Andrew Miskys presents: Disko

6 August 2020

Events

The Time We Call Our Own: Save Some Space: Saad Shaffi (24 Kitchen Street), Chris Torpey (Bido Lito) and Emma Warren

13 August 2020

Events

The Time We Call Our Own: Tobias Zielony presents: Maskirovka

20 August 2020

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The Time We Call Our Own: ‘if we can’t all dance, I don’t wanna be a part of ur world :))))’: Stephanie Francis-Shanahan

27 August 2020

Projects

Activity Packs for Older People

20 July 2020

Projects

Young People + Family Activity Packs

20 July 2020

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Open Rooms #3: Photographing the Internet (w/ Mishka Henner)

7 May 2020

Projects

Open Rooms #2: Separated Together

30 April 2020

Projects

Open Rooms #7: Photography Does Not Love You (Katrina Sluis w/ Jacob Bolton)

2 July 2020

Projects

Open Rooms #8: Photography and Racialisation

9 July 2020

Projects

Open Rooms #5: Class of 2020 — Seba Kurtis in conversation with Mariama Attah

18 June 2020

Projects

Love is an Action

11 June 2020

Projects

OPEN ROOMS #4: INDEPENDENT PUBLISHING W/ COLIN WILKINSON

21 May 2020

Open Eye Stories

4 May 2020

Open Rooms

4 May 2020

Exhibitions

Online Programme

15 March 2020

Exhibitions

DIGITAL WINDOW GALLERY: OPEN SOURCE #16 – PAULINA KOROBKIEWICZ

1 March - 31 March 2020

Main Exhibition Future Exhibitions

Postponed: The Time We Call Our Own

3 April 2020

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

DIGITAL WINDOW GALLERY: OPEN SOURCE #15 – JONATHAN LYNCH

1 February - 29 February 2020

Projects

PLATFORM Issue 01

21 January 2020

LAUNCH: THE DARK FIGURE*

20 February - 20 February 2020

Past Exhibitions

DIGITAL WINDOW GALLERY: OPEN SOURCE #14 – SAHAN NUHOGLU

16 January 2020

Exhibitions

VISUAL RIGHTS

16 January - 22 March 2020

Exhibitions

THE DARK FIGURE*

20 February - 22 March 2020

Past Exhibitions

EXPOSED

3 April 2020

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

DIGITAL WINDOW GALLERY: NOW, FOR THE FUTURE – OPEN SOURCE X SHUTTER HUB

1 November - 30 November 2019

Past Exhibitions

Brilliant City 中文

30 October - 16 November 2019

Tong Yan Gai — Chinatown—中文

7 October - 24 October 2019

Exhibitions

HE 中文

17 October - 21 December 2019

Exhibitions

JUMP! 中文

4 October - 26 October 2019

Exhibitions

A Room of Our Own: a Fast Forward Women in Photography Exhibition 中文

17 October - 21 December 2019

Exhibitions

DINU LI: ANATOMY OF PLACE — (中文)

17 October - 21 December 2019

Exhibitions

Peer to Peer 中文

17 October - 22 December 2019

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

DIGITAL WINDOW GALLERY: OPEN SOURCE 12 – KATHY ANNE LIM

1 October - 31 October 2019

Past Exhibitions

LOOK PHOTO BIENNIAL / SATELLITE

17 October - 21 December 2019

Past Exhibitions

JUMP! — Curated by Sian Bonnell

4 October - 26 October 2019

Past Exhibitions

UCLan: Brilliant City

30 October - 16 November 2019

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

Derek Man & Tobias Brebner: Tong Yan Gai — Chinatown

7 October - 24 October 2019

Past Exhibitions

YAN WANG PRESTON: HE

17 October - 21 December 2019

Past Exhibitions

A Room of Our Own: a Fast Forward Women in Photography Exhibition

17 October - 21 December 2019

Past Exhibitions

Dinu Li: The Anatomy of Place

17 October - 21 December 2019

Past Exhibitions

NORTH: FASHIONING IDENTITY

14 September - 21 December 2019

Past Exhibitions

Peer to Peer

17 October - 22 December 2019

Past Exhibitions

SIXTEEN at Ellesmere Port Library

19 September - 27 September 2019

WE ARE KIRKBY

23 September - 16 November 2019

Past Exhibitions

DIGITAL WINDOW GALLERY: OPEN SOURCE 11 – NATHAN CUTLER

1 September - 30 September 2019

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

DIGITAL WINDOW GALLERY: OPEN SOURCE 10 – JOCELYN ALLEN

1 August - 31 August 2019

Exhibitions

A Portrait Of…

2 August - 29 September 2019

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

DIGITAL WINDOW GALLERY: OPEN SOURCE 09 – ARABELLE ZHUANG

1 July - 31 July 2019

Close
Close
Image: Kerry McSweeney
Image: Kerry McSweeney

Kelly Stubbs — Transmission: Reframing the Visible

The idea of being marginalised is referred to often and holds special attention for artists, who know all about the importance of what is happening at the edge of the frame. The frame is in itself a censorious thing, being the limit of what is seen and what is not. Sometimes the transgender community, through history, has sneaked inside the frame and we have an image here or there of Molly Houses or portrayals of folk with indeterminate genders. Mostly however, the trans community is kept out of the image. In recent years some trans folk have started becoming the focus of images, but this tends to mainly be transgender women who fit a certain representation of beauty.

This image fits the worldview of the trans community, perceived as an offshoot of a reality show about drag queens. The symbolic image for the whole transgender community is a hyper-sexualised version of womanhood. The potency of this image is enshrined in the fear mongering about transgender women using the toilet, where caricatures of us as predators in drag are thrown about like candyfloss. This grossly distorted image is sadly still acceptable, where so many crudely prejudiced cartoons have become rightly rejected by society.

This reduction of the infinite complexity of transgender personalities to a single, jaundiced symbol, lazily portrays gender divergence as an addendum to sexuality and belittles the community. The reality is that the transgender community is every bit as diverse as the non-trans, cis world…..except that we are a community who are largely hidden. Working with transgender youths, Transmission Art Project had created an event designed to highlight our experience of being alienated from the mainstream public world. This difficulty in engaging with public life is perhaps the single most common experience to all transgender people, whether it is about going to the loo or accessing the appropriate documentation. The event was designed to turn the tables and give the audience an experience of being outside the action, looking in from the outside, at a group of trans young people having fun – replicating the trans experience of marginalisation and exclusion, whilst engaging with the imagery. However, the covid crisis hit and we all became isolated. For most of society, that isolation will become a memory, as the frame fills up again with cis-folk rightly enjoying their return to freedom. If we return to that world which preceded the crisis, we transgender folk will remain outside the frame or in the margins at best. We will by and large continue only as an audience, looking at the world through the frames of our TV screens or windows, unable to participate.

Most of the younger transgender community do not identify as wholly male or wholly female, but rather as non-binary or fluid about their gender. They pick and choose, which aspects of the different genders fit them most comfortably & are forging a path of incredible beauty, which is more or less completely missed, as the lens passes them by to focus on a face which is of interest largely because it hides the fact it is transgender. The question of visibility has a long history within the wider LGBT+ community, where the intensely visible nature of transgender women was seen as an embarrassment and lead to trans individuals being hidden, in the pursuit of accommodation to mainstream society. The other side of this coin has been the way the image of Rosie the Riveter has become so potent, that transgender men have struggled to make themselves seen. The co-option of traditionally male clothing for all genders has become so ubiquitous, that where differences in biology are foregrounded for transgender women through the spotlight on hypersexualisation, transgender men are subsumed by a sea of utilitarian clothing, forever out of frame.

 

Words: Kelly Stubbs

Images: Kerry McSweeney

 

@transmission_art

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