Events

Sustainability – Climate Change and the impact from Industry

17 May 2022

Open Source Exhibitions

Open Source #22: Bags For Life – Luke Saxon

1 May - 31 May 2022

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

VR: LOOK Climate Lab 2022

13 January - 20 March 2022

Past Events

An evening with Maytree Poets

28 April 2022

Past Events Events

Recovery in Focus & Inside Stories

14 May 2022

Past Events

Homo Humour film screening & Q&A

7 May 2022

Events

Painting the Mersey in 17 Canvases Coast to Coast to Coast

21 May 2022

Exhibitions Open Source Exhibitions

Open Source #21: Ancestral Folk – Eunice Pais

1 April - 30 April 2022

Exhibitions Main Exhibition

Follow The River, Follow The Thread

1 April - 12 June 2022

Exhibitions

Saturday Girl About Town at Castlefield Gallery New Art Spaces: Wigan

28 January 2022

Past Exhibitions

WE

31 March - 1 May 2022

Past Events

Who Cares? – Symposium exploring the role of art & design in health & care

26 April 2022

Past Events

Socially Engaged Photography Network: North West regional meet up event ‘Co-authoring the Collection’ 

28 April 2022

HOPE COMMUNITY GARDEN/ FEEDING LIVERPOOL: REIMAGINING YOUR FUTURE FOOD NEIGHBOURHOOD

9 March 2022

SESSION 3: DERELICTION TO DELICIOUS

11 March 2022

PELOTON COOP: JOY RIDE

18 March 2022

Exhibitions

DIGITAL WINDOW GALLERY: Grow Your Own

23 February - 20 March 2022

Taking Root Bootle – Growing on the Streets: Involving local residents In greening up public spaces

10 March 2022

Liverpool Food Growers Network: Panel Discussion

12 March 2022

Past Events

ECOSYSTEM 2: OPEN CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS

19 February - 20 March 2022

SCOUSE FLOWERHOUSE

2 March - 5 March 2022

Session 3: Windowsill Growing with Croxteth Community Garden

12 March 2022

Taster Menu

11 March 2022

Session 2: Dereliction to delicious

11 March 2022

Session 2: Introduction to beekeeping

11 March 2022

Session 1: Dereliction to delicious

11 March 2022

Session 1: Introduction to Beekeeping

11 March 2022

Session 2: Windowsill Growing with Croxteth Community Garden

10 March 2022

Session 2: Relax and Grow

10 March 2022

Session 1: Windowsill Growing with Croxteth Community Garden

10 March 2022

Session 1: Relax and Grow

10 March 2022

Compost Works – An Introduction into Composting

9 March 2022

Hope Community Garden/ Feeding Liverpool: Reimagining your Future Food Neighbourhood

9 March 2022

Liverpool Food Growers Network: Rethinking our Food System

9 March - 12 March 2022

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

VR: NOVUS: Restricted Views – Creative Outlooks

1 December - 12 December 2021

Exhibitions Past Exhibitions

VR: Collective Matters

1 October - 12 December 2021

Exhibitions

Digital Window Gallery: On the Brink

27 January - 19 March 2022

Exhibitions Open Source Exhibitions

Open Source #20: Matt Dunne

9 February - 28 February 2022

Arts Groupie Workshops

26 February - 19 March 2022

TREE: Live Storytelling Session

19 March 2022

Horti-Culture Sharing Sessions with Arts Groupie and Incredible Edible

19 March - 9 March 2022

Liver Bird Safari with Arts Groupie

26 February - 26 February 2022

Past Events

Shop the Look Project with Emma Summerscales Open studio

11 February 2022

Mersey Green Map

4 February - 14 March 2022

Climate Cafés

26 January - 9 March 2022

Growing Sudley CIC: Nature’s Apothecary Workshops

23 January - 6 March 2022

Cyanotype Workshop with Edd Carr

25 February 2022

Read Now Write Now: Climate Champions Writing Workshops

30 January - 17 March 2022

Hope and Fear

25 January - 30 March 2022

Past Events

Peloton Liverpool Cooperative

16 February - 18 February 2022

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Hope and Fear: China’s Environmental Values

TUESDAY 15 FEBRUARY / 11AM–1PM / BOOK HERE

 

Professor Maurizio Marinelli, History

Since the beginning of the economic reforms in 1978, rapid industrialization, extensive land development and full-scale urbanization have been the priorities of the Chinese government’s policies. For more than forty years, the Chinese economy has registered growth at an annual average of 9.8%. In 2012, however, it became clear that China was ‘a speeding train at a turning point’: after a prolonged period of high-speed economic growth, Chinese society was experiencing unprecedented ecological pressures and environmental constraints, due to the emergence of serious problems such as soot pollution, ozone depletion, fine particulate matters, and volatile organic compounds. Therefore, in the last decade, we have witnessed a growing emphasis on the importance of re-balancing the economy, promoting sustainable growth, and accepting the ‘New Normal (xin changtai)’: a vision of a qualitatively different developmental pattern within the context of a softer, and perhaps more sustainable, pace of growth.

During the course of this week, we will try to understand what appears to be a shift in the Chinese state’s vision of prosperity, progressively moving from the primary objective of improving the ‘material civilisation’, through the ‘spiritual civilization’, to the promotion of the ‘political civilization’, and finally the construction of the ‘ecological civilization’. Does this indicate a reassessment of the GDP logic of economic growth at all costs, and possibly the necessity to beyond the one-dimensional economic ideology of modernisation development? Is there also a lesson for the rest of the world?

The concept of eco-civilization seems to be linked to the growing awareness of the fact that improvements in environmental protection are essential to economic development. We will ask ourselves the following questions: Can the campaign to ‘Advance Ecological Civilization and Build a Beautiful China’ (Xi, 2014), point in the direction of the necessity to move away from a dominant pattern of full-scale urbanization, which has often prioritized the building of grandiose cities of spectacle as opposed to liveable cities where human beings want to live? Can we draw a connection between eco-civilization and eco-socialism, and therefore address China’s urban challenges as social, as well as environmental, and intrinsically human?

TUESDAY 15 FEBRUARY / 11AM–1PM / BOOK HERE

 

Professor Maurizio Marinelli, History

Since the beginning of the economic reforms in 1978, rapid industrialization, extensive land development and full-scale urbanization have been the priorities of the Chinese government’s policies. For more than forty years, the Chinese economy has registered growth at an annual average of 9.8%. In 2012, however, it became clear that China was ‘a speeding train at a turning point’: after a prolonged period of high-speed economic growth, Chinese society was experiencing unprecedented ecological pressures and environmental constraints, due to the emergence of serious problems such as soot pollution, ozone depletion, fine particulate matters, and volatile organic compounds. Therefore, in the last decade, we have witnessed a growing emphasis on the importance of re-balancing the economy, promoting sustainable growth, and accepting the ‘New Normal (xin changtai)’: a vision of a qualitatively different developmental pattern within the context of a softer, and perhaps more sustainable, pace of growth.

During the course of this week, we will try to understand what appears to be a shift in the Chinese state’s vision of prosperity, progressively moving from the primary objective of improving the ‘material civilisation’, through the ‘spiritual civilization’, to the promotion of the ‘political civilization’, and finally the construction of the ‘ecological civilization’. Does this indicate a reassessment of the GDP logic of economic growth at all costs, and possibly the necessity to beyond the one-dimensional economic ideology of modernisation development? Is there also a lesson for the rest of the world?

The concept of eco-civilization seems to be linked to the growing awareness of the fact that improvements in environmental protection are essential to economic development. We will ask ourselves the following questions: Can the campaign to ‘Advance Ecological Civilization and Build a Beautiful China’ (Xi, 2014), point in the direction of the necessity to move away from a dominant pattern of full-scale urbanization, which has often prioritized the building of grandiose cities of spectacle as opposed to liveable cities where human beings want to live? Can we draw a connection between eco-civilization and eco-socialism, and therefore address China’s urban challenges as social, as well as environmental, and intrinsically human?

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